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IN FLANDERS FIELDS POEM
The World’s Most Famous WAR MEMORIAL POEM
By Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

                                                                                                                   image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-13110716/d0e457e4-f75f-4b2c-8728-a88d73959fb2.jpg 
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
 Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place: and in the sky
 The larks still bravely singing fly
Scarce heard am
id the guns below.

We are the dead: Short days ago,
 We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved: and now we lie
In Flanders fields!  

Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you, from failing hands, we throw
The torch: be yours to hold it high
If ye break faith with us who die,

 We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields
 

Composed at the battlefront on May 3, 1915
during the second battle of Ypres, Belgium

On May 2, 1915, John McCrae’s close friend and former student Alexis Helmer was killed by a German shell. That evening, in the absence of a Chaplain, John McCrae recited from memory a few passages from the Church of England’s “Order of the Burial of the Dead”. For security reasons Helmer’s burial in Essex Farm Cemetery was performed in complete darkness.

The next day, May 3, 1915, Sergeant-Major Cyril Allinson was delivering mail. McCrae was sitting at the back of an ambulance parked near the dressing station beside the YserCanal, just a few hundred yards north of Ypres, Belgium.

As John McCrae was writing his In Flanders Fields poem, Allinson silently watched and later recalled, “His face was very tired but calm as he wrote. He looked around from time to time, his eyes straying to Helmer's grave."

Within moments, John McCrae had completed the “In Flanders Fields” poem and when he was done, without a word, McCrae took his mail and handed the poem to Allinson.

Allinson was deeply moved:

“The (Flanders Fields) poem was an exact description of the scene in front of us both. He used the word blow in that line because the poppies actually were being blown that morning by a gentle east wind. It never occurred to me at that time that it would ever be published. It seemed to me just an exact description of the scene."

(In Flanders Fields.ca)

 

REMEMBERING:

In Canada, Remembrance Day is a public holiday and federal statutory holiday, as well as a statutory holiday in all three territories and in six of the ten provinces (Nova Scotia, Manitoba, Ontario, and being the exceptions). From 1921 to 1930, the Armistice Day Act provided that Thanksgiving would be observed on Armistice Day, which was fixed by statute on the Monday of the week in which 11 November fell. In 1931, the federal parliament adopted an act to amend the Armistice Day Act, providing that the day should be observed on 11 November and that the day should be known as "Remembrance Day". 

 

The Bagogloo Team wishes to express it's heartfelt gratitude to all members of The Canadian Armed Forces; Past, Present and Future; who's bravery, honour and devotion to this Country and it's People, has kept us safe and free.

Please remember to pause at 11am, November 11, and take a moment to remember and give thanks to those who have fought and died, for us, all of us - we honour you.

 

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